A D O P T M E !
adoptable dog Dace

Staff Favorite: Dace!

Learn more
Community Cats

Cat Neighborhood Partnership Program (CatNiPP)


Community cats live in our neighborhoods, but with no particular home. While they can be friendly, they may not be good candidates for living indoors. The CatNiPP program seeks to keep these cats happy and healthy, while reducing overpopulation through spaying and neutering.

The Humane Rescue Alliance's community cat program is aimed at addressing the needs of the thousands of community cats living in the District and of the people who co-exist with them. Our main focus is to humanely reduce the population of community cats through spaying and neutering and through the socialization of young kittens with the potential to be adopted into indoor homes. We offer resources and guidance for best practices in caring for community cats as well as for deterring unwanted cats from your yard.

Click here to learn about the services CatNiPP provides.


Trap, Neuter, Return Saves Lives

CatNiPP works with residents and volunteers to Trap, Neuter and Return (TNR) cats in order to get to the root of the problem – reproduction. TNR is the most humane, practical and effective long-term strategy and its use is promoted by the DC government (D.C. Code §8-1802). We depend on the participation of community members, as HRA does not currently have the resources to trap all of the cats in need on our own.

Services & Policies

The Humane Rescue Alliance offers a free CatNiPP service package for community cats residing within the District of Columbia, including:

  • Spay or neuter surgery
  • FVRCP and rabies vaccinations
  • Ear-tip

For cats living outside the District, we offer the service package for the low cost of $45 per cat. Appointments are required and all cats must arrive at the clinic in a trap. Traps are available for loan with a $60 deposit. Please contact us to schedule an appointment and inquire about traps:

202-726-2556 x313
CatNiPP@humanerescuealliance.org

CatNiPP Services and Polices
View Sunday clinic schedule for 2017.


Community Cats: Neighbor Helping Neighbor

Community cats live in our neighborhoods and have no particular home or owner. They have the skills and support from residents to live successfully outdoors. While many of these cats are social with people, they may not be good candidates for adoption. Providing food and shelter for the cats helps keep them happy and healthy. It also deters cats from foraging in trash cans and setting up homes where they are not wanted. The best community cat caretakers are community members. HRA encourages caretakers to feed and shelter cats in a way that reduces conflicts with neighbors who may not want the cats on their property and to be proactive in reducing conflicts when they arise. If you feed community cats, it is vital that you ensure the cats are spayed and neutered. Two well-fed cats can quickly turn into twenty.

Learn more about available community cat resources and how you can help.

Find the perfect Companion

Search cats Search dogs Search other